This guy on Tumblr asked for a list of women in history who were ripped off by men for their discoveries…

badasswomen  sevenpoints
 

juliedillon:

peggyleads:

gynocraticgrrl:

 drziggystardust:

cuculine:

drziggystardust:

appropriately-inappropriate:

myoinositol:

appropriately-inappropriate:

drziggystardust:

 

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putmeincoach reblogged your post and added:

Please, list me all of those female architects, scientists and great minds that male architects and scientists ripped off. No, really, I am curious to see all of these female inventors and pioneers you’re speaking of.

Ada Lovelace – Founder of scientific computing, the world’s first computer programmer. Modern computers as we know them wouldn’t exist without her innovations.

Queen Seondeok of Silla – Silla was one of the three kingdoms in Korea’s Three Kingdom period and Seondeok was its first reigning Queen. She is well known for setting up the first astronomy tower in Asia and for founding several Buddhist temples.

Cecilia Payne – Discovered what the sun was made of. Was then prohibited from publishing her work. Henry Norris Russel republished her work as his own and received all the credit.

Jocelyn Bell Burnell – Discovered the first pulsar. Anthony Hewish took credit and listed her a non involved assistant, he had nothing to do with the discovery. Not only did he receive all the credit, he received the Nobel prize.

Lise Meitner – Co-discovered nuclear fission and her male colleagues refused to name her in their publication. The men won the Nobel Prize, and she received no credit.

Nettie Stevens – Discovered chromosomes determined sex, when she sent her work to a man for peer review, he published a book of her work passing it off as his own and named her a technician.

Marie Curie – Noted Nobel prize laureate (first lady to earn 2), discovered radium. Barred from many prestigious male dominated academic organizations like the French Academy due to being a female. She was demonized and attacked by men all her life simply for being superior to men in the field, and men in general.

Marie Van Brittan Brown – Co-invented home security surveillance that is the precursor of home security systems today. You wont hear her name in history class, not only is she a woman, she is a black woman. ERASED by nasty white men LIKE YOU.

Lucy Terry – Another historical black woman, erased by neo-colonialist white men. This young lady was a teenager when she composed the first known work of literature by an African American person.

Mary Shelley -Invented science fiction. She literally invented a genre of literature, she was a teenager when she wrote her first piece. Across the northern American continent. While she was pregnant.

Sacagawea – An indigenous American (Lemhi Shoshone) who led Lewis & Clark across the northern American continent. While she was pregnant.

Elizabeth Gurley Flynn – feminist, suffragette, civil rights activist, founded the ACLU

Sarah Parker Remond -worked to desegregate schools and end slavery. Also noted physician- but you wont read about her in your white history books because she is black. Its like you white dudes just threw together some shitty fan fiction and called that history.

Hedy Lamarr – came up with an early technique for spread spectrum communications and frequency hopping, necessary for wireless communication from the pre-computer age to the present day. She invented your wi-fi in addition to being an actress. SUCK IT.

Vera Rubin -Rejected from Princeton because she was female, went to Cornell instead and discovered dark matter while earning her PhD. Went on to make contributions that your simpleminded white male self couldn’t begin to fathom.

This list is just a taste of what women have accomplished. Women invented the core technologies that make civilization possible. This is a not a feminist myth, this is what anthropologists KNOW. Women have made those contributions in spite of astonishing hurdles. Hurdles like not being allowed to go to school, or not being allowed to work in an office with men, or join a professional society, or walk on the street, or own property. Hell, some of these women were legally deemed property, a fraction of a human being.

Eleanor of Aquitaine, Queen Catherine the Great, Queen Christina of Sweden, Anacaona of Hispaniola, Hypatia of Athens, Aspasia of Thebes, Dido, Cleopatra, Nefertiti, Nzhinga of Matamba, Joan of Arc, Queen Elizabeth I, Queen Anne Boleyn, Queen Catherine of Spain, Queen Isabella of Castille, Florence Nightingale, Boudicca of the Picts, Hildegard of Bingen, Heloise of Paris, St Theresa of Avila, Theodora of Constantinople, Queen Sybila of Jerusalem, Queen Catherine de Medici, Mirabai of India, Cady Stanton, Margaret Sanger, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Emmeline Pankhurst, Emily Murphy, Rosa Luxembourg, ArchEmpress Maria Theresa of the Austrian-Hungarian Empire

…..

Did you want more? Those are just the ones I could think of off the top of my head.

aww you put in mirabai 🙂

and of course…from the sciences…rosalind franklin, jocelyn burnell, ester lederburg, LISE MEITNER, mathilde krim, and countless, countless others (did you know that menten of michaelis-menten was a woman?); these are just from the west; this doesn’t count women elsewhere who are trafficked and raped from birth instead of being allowed to explore their potential in the sciences. here’s a list of indian womenovershadowed in the sciences. if women’s potential in the sciences were fulfilled and nurtured and credit duly given then it would probably change the world as we know it overnight. 

Of course! Theology was a major area of philosophical study, and from what I read, she was very knowledgeable And any woman who survives three assassination attempts (iirc? I know there was more than just the one) is p badass. Also women have always had a place in the sciences. We were the first computer programmers, telephone technicians and medical professionals (rural women figured out how to prevent smallpox hundreds of years before Germ Theory or the concept of inoculation was a thing). Haven’t died of smallpox recently? You’re welcome. ❤

You ladies are amazing! All this history, our history off the top of your head!

 

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Thank you both, this is exactly what I was trying to convey to this ignorant dudebro. Who has yet to respond, btw.

From Ada Lovelace to Grace Hopper, computers owe everything to women. All six “human computers” working on the famous ENIAC machine were women, and isn’t it funny how people nowadays have some sort of idea of what ENIAC was but not who maintained it?  In fact, computer programming, especially software programming, used to be considered a woman’s job.  They were still paid less than the men who were also in the field.  But they still did it better.

The first person to crack part of the German Enigma cypher was a woman we only know today as Mrs BB Her solution was dismissed as being too simplistic, though she turned out to be correct.  But we still don’t know her name.  She worked at Bletchley Park, home of the UK’s cryptographers before and during WWII – most of the people working there were women (I’ve seen it as high as estimating 80% women).  One of them, Mavis Batey, died a couple weeks ago, in fact.  She decoded the Italian navy Enigma cypher –AT NINETEEN.

Also, to throw in some of my other favorite ladies that I don’t see listed so far: Simone de Beauvoir, Émilie du Châtelet, Princess Elisabeth of the Palantine, Sofia Vasilyevna Kovalevskaya, Emmy Noether…  I could go on and on.  All sorts of brilliant ladies who directly influenced men we cherry pick from history (Voltaire, Sartre, etc.) or whose accomplishments we’ve forgotten despite their value have existed throughout time, everywhere and every place.

Oh look, more erased women who built civilization as we know it! What would women do without men to steal our discoveries and take credit for them? IDK thrive, probably

Its like you white dudes just threw together some shitty fan fiction and called that history.

The 50 Most Important Women in Science

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Three percent of tenured professors of physics in this country are women. Nonetheless, a woman physicist stopped light in her lab at Harvard. Another woman runs the linear accelerator at Stanford. A woman discovered the first evidence for dark matter. A woman found the top quark. The list doesn’t stop there, but the point is clear.
Three years ago, Discover started a project to look into the question of how women fare in science. We knew there were large numbers of female researchers doing remarkable work, and we asked associate editor Kathy A. Svitil to talk to them. The result of her investigation is a selection of 50 of the most extraordinary women across all the sciences. Their achievements are detailed in the pages that follow.
To read their stories is to understand how important it is that the barriers facing women in science be broken down as quickly and entirely as possible. If just one of these women had gotten fed up and quit—as many do—the history of science would have been impoverished. Even the women who have stuck with it, even those who have succeeded spectacularly, still report that being a woman in this intensely male world is, at best, challenging and, at worst, downright disheartening.
It will take goodwill and hard work to make science a good choice for a woman, but it is an effort at which we cannot afford to fail. The next Einstein or the next Pasteur may be alive right now—and she might be thinking it’s not worth the hassle.

Ruzena Bajcsy Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of California at Berkeley In 1979 Bajcsy helped create robots that could sense and respond to their environment. She now heads an innovative institute where researchers develop smart low-power sensors that both compute and communicate. Bajcsy believes the sensors will be “the next revolution in technology.” They can monitor energy consumption in buildings, watch for forest fires, or keep tabs on people by, for example, calling 911 if a person with Alzheimer’s disease wanders from his home.
Jacqueline K. Barton Professor of Chemistry, California Institute of Technology Barton discovered that DNA conducts electric current but not as well—or not at all—when its tight organization is disrupted by damage from certain chemicals or mutations. That finding should allow researchers to look for mutations, using chips made of strands of DNA attached to gold on silicon wafers. Barton is investigating whether nature has developed tactics to cope with such damage: “Are there important sites that are insulated? Where are electrons funneled? This makes us think about DNA in an entirely new way.”
Anna K. Behrensmeyer Research Paleobiologist, Smithsonian Institution Behrensmeyer has spent almost three decades at Amboseli Park in Kenya watching animals disintegrate and fossilize as she researches taphonomy—the science of burial. “There is a bias in the fossil record caused by all of the factors that determine whether or not something becomes a fossil. Did it have hard parts? Did it die in the water where it could more easily be buried and preserved?” That bias, says Behrensmeyer, gives us only a relatively small window to the past. “My work tries to illuminate what we can see through that window.”
Elizabeth Blackburn Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California at San Francisco Each time a cell divides, its chromosomes shorten slightly. To protect vital genes from being lopped off, chromosomes are capped with telomeres, blocks of DNA and protein. Telomeres are maintained by telomerase, an enzyme discovered by Blackburn (see story Why science must adapt to women) and biologist Carol Greider. In most healthy cells, telomerase production eventually ceases, telomeres whittle down, and the cell dies. Blackburn’s research has shown that in cancer cells, the enzyme never shuts off, and cells become immortal: “Telomerase is reactivated in about 90 percent of tumors. It is a great favorite of cancer cells,” and thus a target for new drugs.
Sarah Boysen Professor of Psychology, The Ohio State University Boysen’s colony of 11 chimpanzees are often as rambunctious as a class of preschoolers, and her research shows they share another trait with toddlers: the ability to do simple arithmetic. The chimps can add, subtract, understand fractions, and associate Arabic numerals with the quantity of objects they represent. “We attribute to the human mind the ability to put information together in novel and innovative ways,” she says. “But there are other minds on the planet that can spontaneously create new ways to process information and solve problems.”
Rita Colwell Director, National Science Foundation Her day job “saturates” her time, but Colwell says she would feel “starved” without her research on cholera, now 25 years deep. “We took this elegant, interdisciplinary research involving molecular biology, oceanography, remote sensing, and clinical medicine and came up with a very simple technique to prevent the disease: filtering water through sari cloth.” That strategy, she found, reduces the number of cases by roughly 50 percent. “This is the kind of holistic approach we need to solve complicated scientific issues.”
Margaret Conkey Director, Archaeological Research Facility, University of California at Berkeley “There has long been a heavy bias toward seeing the whole human past in terms of male action,” says this expert in prehistoric art who encourages anthropologists to reinterpret ancient images and objects. “I have been trying to convince people that we can’t explain 20,000 years of material by saying it was all magic for the hunt.” She heads a team that surveys the landscape in southern France, searching for traces of the day-to-day lives of the cave painters.
Esther Conwell Professor of Chemistry, University of Rochester Half a century ago, Conwell’s research on how electrons course through silicon and other semiconducting materials jump-started the computer age. Now she studies the movement of electrical charges through DNA. “The motion of charge in DNA can lead to mutations that can be cancer producing. And the properties of DNA could be useful in assembling circuit elements in nano-electronic circuits.”

Gretchen Daily Research Professor, Stanford University The key to protecting ecosystems and preserving biodiversity successfully, says Daily, is to recognize the economic value of services that nature provides. “Ecologists used to be totally impractical in their recommendations to policymakers, while economists totally ignored the natural capital base upon which human well-being depends,” she says. Her work helped spur a revolution in conservation policy, uniting economists and ecologists. “I’ve been lucky to be part of a movement that produced new partnerships between them.”
Ingrid Daubechies Professor of Mathematics and Applied and Computational Mathematics, Princeton University To analyze the signal of an image, sound, electrocardiogram tracing, or even a turbulent gas, one must break it down into simpler parts. The parts that scientists and engineers use are Daubechies’s wavelets—mathematical building blocks that are also used for data compression and encryption. “If you painted a picture with a sky, clouds, trees, and flowers, you would use a different size brush depending on the size of the features,” says the mathematician. “Wavelets are like those brushes.”
Persis Drell Director of Research, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Growing up, Drell, whose father is a theoretical physicist, met some of the most famous physicists of the 20th century, “and yet I was determined to be a mathematician.” Then a teacher in college made physics seem exciting to her. Now, using giant particle colliders, she studies elementary particle physics. “We’re trying to figure out what the world is made of at its most fundamental level. Because I have young kids, I think of it as finding the smallest Lego that you can make everything else out of.”

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